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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
boehner is even interested in? >> i think it is probably something that he might consider. this is how negotiations work. congressional "fight club." they stake out their positions and sort of move closer together as they come together and actually meet and discuss this. there are couple options what they can do on the table. president signaled perhaps it doesn't have to be all about getting rates to clinton era levels. perhaps getting revenue from other places. i think that would be healthier, broader tax reform kind of deal made. i'm not sure whether they're all savvy enough to make that deal. i mean. martha: seems to me that is the major issue here. that is what john boehner was hinting at. he is suggesting that if you remove some of the loopholes that is a tax increase on the wealthy in this country. i feel like that is a message that has gotten across in perhaps a clear enough way. if you do same thing for u.s. corporations and roof move tax loopholes and don't end up in a situation where ge doesn't pay anything and small business pays through the nose. why isn't that kind of refo
budget. the congress has a copy of it. i do think it would be helpful if speaker boehner would spell out his approach to revenue. he has said some positive things, but we have not seen any substance to his proposals and his remarks. so i think that would be helpful to get that out in the public as we move forward. >> what about the fact that people like jeff sessions who is a ranking member on the budget committee is asking that efforts be made to have these negotiations open to the american public so they can see what's going on? >> as i said, i think the ideas that are all exchanged as part of this process should be open to the public and the president was very clear as to what his revenue proposal is. it's on the super net. you can actually go see it. speaker boehner has said he's open to raising revenue. he has not told us or the american public exactly how he would do it. so i do think it would be useful if he would spell it out, then we would have two clear proposals on the table to compare. >> well, it's going to be a long negotiation, it seems, tough negotiation to work things th
speaker john boehner stated what his feeling is on dealing with the fiscal cliff. and that sort of perfunctory here's my position sort of gave way to a back and forth between these two leaders. nothing was settled, but the tone was reportedly good and both republicans and democrats in the room seemed aware this would come down to dealing with tax reform and entitlement reform, and the source told me when the president raised the issue of increasing revenue, there was no, "no, we're not going to do that" from republicans, and when republicans talked about entitlement reform, the president agreed that was something that has to be done. >> well, it sounds good, but do you think when it comes down to the brass tacks both sides are actually ready to bend a bit? >> reporter: i think they're ready to bend than they were going into that whole debacle that was the debt situation. there are some specifics that need to be sorted out for sure, exactly how to raise revenue. as you know, democrats would like to raise taxes on the wealthy. republicans prefer to close loopholes, eliminate deduc
when you saw nancy pelosi out there. you saw john boehner out there saying we are hopeful we can get a deal done. and the market had a positive reaction to that. yet it lost that upside throughout the day, teetered back and forth between positive and negative territory. finally, closing the day out positive, so perhaps that suggests that maybe we are a little bit closer. but here's the thing, randi, they've got to get something done. they've got to solve this issue. because if not, the consequences are severe. >> but you listen to some people, and they suggest that fears of fallen off the cliff are overblown. what are the real consequences here? >> the real consequences are another recession. i mean, i can tell you every ceo that i'm talking to right now says i'm not making major decisions. i'm waiting. i'm standing by the sidelines. i can't hire a lot of people, i can't invest in a lot of infrastructure because i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next 45 days. i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next three months. so there's a lot of holdup. now,
are they willing to do. there is concern in the far right flank that speaker john boehner will raise tax rates for the top 2 percent. they want to preserve tax cuts for every tax bracket. no one is sure that the speaker is doing that. they are not discussing giving in on the top 2 percent but i don't think that is a promise they will keep. we'll have to wait and see. i know that they wanted entitlement reform on the table if not right now, a promise that we'll get to it in the new year and overall tax reform. those are the demands from the republican side. >> heather: what about spending cuts in terms of democrats? >> there is another hard issue. democrats are going to try to hold as much on spending cuts, but they know that the cuts have to be part of the deal. you can't get republicans along were anything unless there is something on that side. how far are democrats willing to go? on spending cuts and overhauling entitlement reform which is the main driver of the nation's debt. you may see a deal where there is tax increase if democrats are willing to go much further on entitlement reform an
. former lt. governor of new york. and author of decoding the obama health law. john boehner said it is now the law of the land. good to see you. biggest colonel to me, my family and to people out there watching. will my quality of care care change? >> first of all, you may lose the plan you get on your job. and you may lose full-time job status as a result. this law says that employers. >> is this all of it. >> this is all of it. >> we like our guests to bring us cake not 2,000 pages of healthcare legislation. >> unfortunately this is what you have got. this law says that employers with 50 or more full-time workers have to provide health insurance. not just any health insurance but the one size fits all government designed plan. that cost almost twice as much as what many employers currently provide. so, as a result. employers in many cases are going to drop the coverage and may even move their full-time employees into part time status to avoid the penalty. >> we have already seen companies doing that. >> that's right. and the government actually predicts that under this employer mandate,
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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